Jun 162015
 

A few years back I recall reading a line in Stephen King’s ‘On Writing’ in which he said “If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. There’s no way around these two things that I’m aware of, no shortcut.”

Truer words were never spoken, and this little tidbit is arguably the crux of the book.  Please don’t assume that is all you need from the book (trust me…’On Writing’ is essential reading), but it is an incredibly sweeping statement that speaks to the age old belief in ‘practice makes perfect’.  If you’re not constantly honing your craft – studying and doing – you will never master it (as much as any of us ever master anything).

A lot of my own free time lately is spent working on whisky reviews for my other site (www.allthingswhisky.com) or beating the hell out of my keyboard working on a mixed bag of original fiction pieces.  I keep promising that one or two will end up posted here, but I haven’t yet got ’round to it.  Soon.  I promise.

But no matter how much I write, that is only half of the equation.  The other half  is, as Mr. King mentions, reading.  The pace at which we work our way through these Liquorature selections is never enough to fill the hole in me.  I generally plow through a few books in the interim periods between finishing off club picks.  Thought maybe I’d share a few that have kept me turning pages in the two weeks since our last meeting.

 

Patterson_Along-Came-a-Spider‘Along Came A Spider’ (James Patterson) – Let me start by saying I outright detest this man’s MO.  I think it’s appalling that he leeches disgusting amounts of profit off the blood, sweat and tears of not-yet-established writers.  If you’re unsure as to what I mean, let me give you the gist:  Mr. Patterson comes up with the concept for his books, drafts up an outline and does a little plotting before finally finishing up with the odd bit of editing and such after someone else writes them for him.  Yep.  The book itself is entirely composed by another author whose name ends up in small print on the book cover (and not published on the spine at all, from what I have seen) under the big, bold JAMES PATTERSON.  Hmmm…can you guess who reaps the financial rewards and accolades as one of the world’s bestselling author?  Gimme a break.  As for Patterson’s own literary talents, well…marginal, in my humble opinion.  This book is one of his better ones that I’ve checked out, and is actually written by Patterson himself.  Stepping off the soapbox now.

‘Along Came A Spider’ is an interesting enough story that unravels well and in a few unexpected ways.  It could have gone in several different – and possibly more interesting – directions (and I think I personally would have done something a little darker with it myself), but ultimately it’s a page turner and a quick disposable l’il yarn for beach or plane fare.

 

‘The Loch’ (Steve Alten) – Alten is an interesting cat with a soft spot for the big beasties.  His ‘Meg’ series gives us a look at the the lochlong extinct megalodon, arguably one of nature’s all time scariest creations.  I read the first in that series a long time back, but have subsequently picked up the others and shelved them for future reading.  I’ll dig into them sooner than later, I imagine.  Meg was a fun read on a subject that interests me greatly and Alten gave it a plausible enough delivery overall.  I find him to be a little bit like Crichton in some ways, but he does have his own voice.

‘The Loch’ takes us exactly where you’d suspect.  Into the highlands of Scotland to tackle the mystery of just what the fuck – if anything – lives in the depths of this murky and foreboding little puddle.  Alten’s answer is unique enough and the story definitely takes a few left turns en route to the finale.  I shan’t spill the beans here, but I can see this tale having rather broad appeal.  Great film fodder in the summer blockbuster vein too.

The dialogue, written in ‘Scottish’, if you will, was a bit of a warp to wrap the mind around at first, but it quickly became fun and very unique to this tale.  Can’t wait to dig into ‘Vostok’, Alten’s crossover sequel.

 

cover_ysabel‘Ysabel’ (Guy Gavriel Kay) – Liquorature mate, and currently exiled rum junkie, Lance introduced me (and us) to Kay by way of ‘The Fionavar Tapestry’.  Not being a huge fantasy guy myself I was surprised by how much I ended up enjoying it, and how resonant some of the scenes were.  Not long after, fortune favoured us by revealing that Mr. Kay is a malt fan too.  We’ve shared a few conversations and more than a few drams (by way of creative shipping practices), and I can unequivocally state that I’m a fan of Kay himself even moreso than Kay the author.  At once an everyman and renaissance man.  Adept at taking conversation from sport to politics, from art to music, from current events to historical insight.  Enough of the bromance you say?  So be it.  Check out his Twitter feed for endlessly entertaining and insightful 140 character nuggets.

‘Ysabel’ is a wonderful tale that paints a beautiful and evocative sense of Provence from the age of the Celts to the workings of our modern day.  It brings an element of fantasy (though played closer in style to Gaiman’s ‘American Gods’ than to the trappings of high fantasy), but grounds it with a contemporary relatability.  Some stunningly engaging characters and a poignant little twist to a couple of the characters’ relationships right near the end left me hungry for more.  Another book I hated putting down.

 

‘Finders Keepers’ (Stephen King) – Part two in a planned trilogy related to King’s Hodges character (et al) first met infinders keepers ‘Mr. Mercedes’.  I found this one maybe a little more engaging than that one.  Perhaps it was the literary spin to this story, relating back to a Salinger-esque character, or perhaps it was just the delicious pacing.  Either way it was a fun read, typical of King with incredibly believable characters and dialogue, and hard to put down.  The ending was chilling, and definitely one his best closing acts in recent memory (excluding the stunning and gutting last few pages of ‘Revival’, which knocked me flat on my ass).  Believe me when I say we are set up for a humdinger of a finale in ‘End of Watch’.  Don’t wanna spoil it, but from these first two ‘detective’ sort of stories it looks like we’ll be diving right back into vintage King.

Oh, yeah…and later this year we’ll be privy to another collection of King’s short stories, ‘The Bazaar Of Bad Dreams’.  Those collections are always worth the price of admission.

 

troop‘The Troop’ (Nick Cutter, aka Craig Davidson) – An absolutely repulsive piece of work.  And I mean that as a compliment.  It’s blatantly obvious that Cutter wanted to grab us by the balls and squeeze to the point of either rupture or blackout.  This book has the ability to take you to the very knife-edge of your endurance for squeamish scenes and let’s-change-the-subject passages.  I will often read over the lunch hour, but I literally couldn’t do it with this book.  I’ve read a few others’ perspectives on what sort of mash-up this tale is, but here’s my take: part ‘Lord of the Flies’, part ‘The Ruins’, a little bit of ‘Prey’, a healthy dollop of Stephen King and all of it basted in the gore and nastiness of Jay Bonansinga’s work on ‘The Walking Dead’ novels with Robert Kirkman.  Not the best book I’ve read, by a country mile, but effective.

 

And there you have it.  Still over two weeks until we meet to discuss Daniel Suarez’s ‘Daemon’.  Pretty sure we can squeeze one or two more in before that one.

 

– Curt

Jun 032015
 

Liquorature #069 – “Of Mice And Men” (John Steinbeck)Of Mice

Date:  March 6th, 2015

Host:  Chris

Whisky:  Aberlour a’bunadh (Batch 49), Glenfarclas 1993 (WP Exclusive), Glen Garioch 1999 (WP Exclusive), Compass Box Oak Cross

 

Vikings and bottles and knives, oh my!  (Don’t ask)

Steinbeck.  Finally.  You had to know this was coming.  It was only a matter of when.  I’ve said before, I’m blown away it took us years to reach this touchstone of modern lit.  Not only Steinbeck, but this particular tale.  I debated it a few times as my own selection, but kept assuming someone else would eventually do it.  More than six years on someone finally did.

Not much you can say about a book like this.  Its timeless morality play is simply heartwrenching, even for those who already know the outcome of the tale.  It’s one of the few novels that can still bring me to the edge of tears (ok…maybe just over the edge).  The characters are just downhome, relatable types even if our shared life experiences don’t necessarily give us much of a common ground with these nomadic bindlestiffs.  Steinbeck’s rather sparse approach to writing is somehow still unbelievably evocative.  He paints a scene with delicious richness and immediacy.  The simple fact of the matter is that everyone in the club (and a couple extras in attendance for this meet) found this to be almost beyond criticism, much like the way we butted up against the cold beauty of Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol’.  Well picked, Chris.

Some discussion came back ’round to the Gary Sinise cinematic interpretation as well.  One of the all time great book to film adaptations I’ve ever seen, and certainly the best casting I could possibly imagine.  If you’ve not seen this one, do so.  Malkovitch will give you shivers, Siemaszko will make you wish it was you that put him down for the count and Sinise will show you how a real actor can walk in with understated adeptness and simply ‘become’ that character.  Amazing.  The guys were blown away by a couple scenes we checked out in brief.

This gathering turned out to be an unforgettable occasion, and one of the best club nights in recent memory.  One for the ages and sure to go down in Liquorature lore.  A couple of guests sat in that brought new angles to the discussion and many a laugh.  Chris’s kid brother, Jesse – now a full fledged member – is a student of the literary arts (literally), so has a great grasp of the analytical side in approaching books.  Danny – a mate of many of us – brought laughs by the score (and just a bit of naughtiness to boot).  Didn’t hurt matters that our kind and generous host poured out three big and bold cask strength monsters as well as a solid 46%er.  Sobriety was in short supply by the end of the whole affair.

The end ended in a rather…ummmm…dubious manner, but that is for the ins to know and the outs to speculate over.  Sorry.  What happens in book club…well…

Randoms:  Danny and Jesse sitting in … “what kind of ranch is this” … “I already know the back of your neck ain’t ticklish” … “everybody in the barn would be up for a little necrophilia” … “the purple heart” …things going waaaaay off the rails

Until next…

– Curt